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Your young person has the option of undertake a broad range of options in regards to where they go after school, depending on eligibility, or a mixture of these.

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A truly individualised program will start with the strengths, interests and goals of the young person, and then seek the services that can offer support towards their goals, and that have a philosophy or model of working that aligns with the young person’s and your own values and beliefs.

What is available in your local area?

There are a number of resources to find out what is available to your young person.

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All the services have different models, offer a different range of options, and have different criteria. Some services are statewide and some are regional.

The only way to really get a feel for the different services is to gather information and visit.  The Transition Coach, teachers and other families you know will all have opinions about each service, but the only way to get a feel for what will suit your young person is to do your own research.

It is a good idea to start this process early, if possible while your young person is in year 10 or 11.  Specialist schools may hold an information session for families of senior students – attending one of these sessions is a good way to start.  Some schools or youth services offer a ‘Parents as Career Transition Support’ (PACTS) program.  This program was developed by the Brotherhood of St Laurence in 2003 and has been adapted for students with a disability.

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